Exhibitions

Concealing a Dual Purpose

When I think about the opioid crisis, I admit falling into the pervasive cultural stereotypes about socioeconomic status and addiction in the US. It’s very naive of me, I know, trust me, I know. Maybe I am in denial of the fact that anyone can be introduced to it and become addicted at any moment. Young and old, black and white, rich and poor, heroin addiction doesn’t have a preference – the disease is an equal-opportunity destroyer. So what happens when someone you trust and love is an addict, taking care of your children, under your own roof?

Tilley Stone explores personal objects and the historical context around heroin addiction in her latest exhibition, I Didn’t Want To Be Right, at Mantle Art Space. Originally focused on works on paper and watercolor, Stone leaves her comfort zone and utilizes object-based installations to share the story of how the artist and her husband discovered a family member (that was babysitting their kids at the time) to be a heroin addict. Parallels are drawn between the violation of domestic space and the pervasive elements by which heroin addiction spread. Stone briefly mentioned that she uses Britain’s imperialist position over China for drug trafficking as a metaphor of how the artist and her husband were manipulated and violated in their personal space.

IMG-3569
Tilley Stone, Where did this spoon come from?

Moving clockwise around the gallery, the viewer is taken on a chronological journey of how domestic items were transformed into paraphernalia, strategically concealing a dual purpose.  The viewer is first greeted by a multimedia interactive piece titled “Where did this spoon come from?” composed of a baby mattress on the floor, a baby blanket neatly folded, two sequin pillows, and a dishwasher utensil basket with a burnt silver spoon hidden among colored baby spoons. Stone sets the story with a clear understanding that the user was responsible for looking after her kids. The sequin pillows were custom made to depict a flame on one and a spoon on the other. Swipe your hand in one direction and the flame and spoon are visible; Swipe it in the opposite direction and the objects are hidden behind sequins. Despite it seeming a bit too obvious at first glance, Stone encourages community engagement in a topic that isn’t discussed in polite conversation by having some interactive pieces.

The following installation piece titled “No wonder she’s losing weight; she’s dedicated to working out.” felt too familiar. Protruding from the wall, the artist built two drawers and pasted a photograph of what you would find in your miscellaneous kitchen drawer. Yes, we all have that one drawer that appears to be taken out of a page from an ISpy book. The viewer hovers over the “opened” drawers and nothing seems to be out of the ordinary — you see pens, scissors, and an exercise band among other things. During the artist talk, Stone lightheartedly mentioned that as someone who rarely works out, she saw the exercise band and immediately thought this particular family member had been exercising while watching the kids. We engage with family members so much, it becomes difficult to perceive them objectively as individuals. It wasn’t until much later that she realized the exercise band might have actually been used as a tourniquet.

 

The corner piece is composed of two heavy-duty steel shelving units filled with gallons of filtered water. Stone would open one or two containers at a time and have the water fall into a black, plastic tub surrounded by a mound of soil and poppy flowers. Titled “She’s drinking more water, too!”, this multimedia installation exposes direct ties to heroin usage. Stone shared that filtered water is often used to dilute heroin to make it safe to inject. She used the poppy flower garden as a metaphor for how her domestic space was being invaded by this drug. Despite the literal explanation to this installation, I can’t help but think of the painting The Death of Marat by Jacques-Louis David. The empty black tub in the installation can be interpreted as a coffin or burial site among the garden of poppy flowers. Poppies have long been used as a symbol of sleep, peace, and death. However, I argue that this interpretation isn’t that of literal death, but a figurative one — the death of innocence, trust, and safety.

It was important for the artist to alter ready-made objects for domestic purposes or use objects directly from home throughout the installation. In the final piece of the multimedia installation titled “It must have blended in with the counter, so she left it behind.,” the artist includes a white door that opens to a view of a hallway console table and a family picture frame hanging above. Instead of including family pictures in the frame, Stone puts pictures of different types of countertop granites that resemble various color samples of heroin. On the hallway table, you see a small white rocking horse, countertop samples, and an hourglass filled with poppy seeds. Referencing a slang term for heroin and the source of opium, as well as heroin, morphine, and codeine, Stone blurs the line between paraphernalia and everyday household items. She makes an effort to either hide or keep these versatile household items out in the open as something innocent.

 

All four installations in the exhibition were titled after conversations Stone had with her husband when noticing these signs. When her husband found the drug bag on the counter and realized it was heroin, he didn’t want to be right. The artist chose those exact words to title this cathartic exhibition. Stone shares with us the personal journey of vulnerability, denial, frustration, and discovery. She mentions that she had never really experienced denial before and never fully understood it until now. The artist shares that her relationship to said family member didn’t allow her to think clearly as she saw these items around the house.

Confronting the reality that a loved one is an addict and has betrayed your trust is extremely difficult. While we can’t claim Stone’s experience as our own, or completely understand what she went through, I can’t help but feel a slight disconnect. Perhaps it’s the clean and neat presentation of each installation that didn’t allow me to fully engage with the personal and emotional journey Stone and her husband went through. While discussing her practice, Stone mentioned that this was her first body of work that is wholly personal, and perhaps there are still internal barriers in place that keep those personal feelings from entering this artwork and therefore being experienced by the viewer. I truly admire Stone for opening up and sharing a personal testimony. Putting your whole self and experiences into your art is a very vulnerable process, and I hope to see Stone utilize the practice more in the future.

In line with their mission and vision, Mantle Art Space’s current exhibition I Didn’t Want to be Right dismantles barriers within the creation and experience of contemporary art. Tilley Stone and Mantle Art Space use art to help share personal stories, hardships, and growth with the community. If you or anyone you know might be struggling with addiction, don’t hesitate in reaching out to the San Antonio Recovery Center or the National for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

About the Artist

Tilley Stone was raised in Pearland, Texas and received a BFA from The University of North Texas (2008). She remained active in the North Texas art scene after graduation exhibiting drawings and paintings in Dallas/Fort Worth. She continued her education at the University of Cincinnati where she was awarded a travel grant to an artist residency in Budapest, Hungary (2011). Upon graduating with a MFA, she moved back to Texas and has begun working with Alvin Community College students. Her focus is to cultivate a creative environment that is accessible to the community by supporting student growth and achievement through making art.

I Didn’t Want to be Right
On View through March 1, 2019
Mantle Art Space
714 Fredericksburg Road
San Antonio, TX, 78201
By Appointment Only
mantlestudios@gmail.com

Ocultando un doble propósito

Cuando pienso en la crisis de los opioides, admito caer en los estereotipos culturales generalizados sobre el estatus socioeconómico y la adicción en los Estados Unidos. Es muy inocente de mi parte, lo sé, créeme, lo sé. Tal vez niegue el hecho de que cualquier persona puede ser presentada a las drogas y volverse adicta en cualquier momento. Jóvenes, viejos, blancos, negros, ricos y pobres, la adicción a la heroína no tiene preferencia: la enfermedad es un destructor imparcial. Entonces, ¿qué sucede cuando alguien en quien confías y amas es un adicto, que cuida de tus hijos bajo tu propio techo?

Tilley Stone explora objetos personales y el contexto histórico en torno a la adicción a la heroína en su última exposición, I Didn’t Want to be Right, en Mantle Art Space. Originalmente enfocada en trabajos en papel y acuarela, Stone abandona su zona de confort y utiliza instalaciones basadas en objetos para compartir la historia de cómo la artista y su esposo descubrieron a un miembro de la familia (que estaba cuidando a sus hijos) ser un adicto a la heroína. Se trazan paralelos entre la violación del espacio doméstico y los elementos dominantes por los cuales se propaga la adicción a la heroína. Stone mencionó brevemente que ella utiliza la posición imperialista de Gran Bretaña sobre China para el tráfico de drogas como una metáfora de cómo la artista y su marido se sintieron manipulados y violados dentro  su hogar.

IMG-3569
Tilley Stone, Where did this spoon come from? 

Moviéndose en el sentido de las manecillas  del reloj alrededor de la galería, el espectador realiza un viaje cronológico de cómo los artículos domésticos se transformaron en parafernalia, ocultando estratégicamente un doble propósito. El espectador primero ve una pieza interactiva de multimedia titulada “Where did this spoon come from?” compuesta de un colchón para bebés en el piso, una manta para bebés cuidadosamente doblada, dos almohadas de lentejuela y una cesta para utensilios de lavavajillas con una cuchara de plata quemada oculta entre cucharas de bebé coloridas. Stone establece la historia con un claro entendimiento de que el usuario era responsable de cuidar a sus hijos. Las almohadas de lentejuela fueron hechas para mostrar una llama en una y una cuchara en la otra almohada. Al deslizar su mano en una dirección la llama y la cuchara son visibles; Al deslizar en dirección contraria los objetos se ocultan detrás de las lentejuelas. A pesar de que parece un poco obvio a primera vista, Stone alienta la comunidad a discutir este tema al tener algunas piezas interactivas.

La siguiente pieza de instalación titulada “No wonder she’s losing weight; she’s dedicated to working out.” se sintió demasiado familiar. Sobresaliendo de la pared, la artista construyó dos cajones y pegó una fotografía de lo que encontraría en el cajón de la cocina. Sí, ese cajón que todos tenemos y que parece sacado de una página de un libro de ISpy. Al acercarse a los cajones “abiertos,” nada parece estar fuera de lo común: se ven bolígrafos, tijeras y una banda elastica de ejercicio entre otras cosas. Durante la charla de la artista, Stone mencionó despreocupadamente  o inocentemente (no me deja poner acentos) que, como alguien que rara vez hacía ejercicio, inmediatamente pensó que este miembro de la familia en particular había estado haciendo ejercicio mientras observaba a los niños al ver la banda elastica de ejercicio por la casa. Nos acercamos tanto con miembros de la familia que se vuelve difícil percibirlos objetivamente como individuos. No fue hasta mucho más tarde que se dio cuenta de que la banda de ejercicio podría o pudo haber sido utilizada como un torniquete.

 

La pieza de la esquina está compuesta por dos estanterías llenas de galones de agua purificada . Stone abría uno o dos recipientes a la vez y hacía que el agua cayera en una tina negra de plástico rodeada por una pila o un cúmulo  de tierra y flores de amapola. Titulada “She’s drinking more water, too!“, esta instalación multimedia expone una relación directa con el uso de heroína. Stone compartió que el agua purificada  se usa a menudo para diluir la heroína y hacer que sea seguro inyectarla. Ella utilizó el jardín de flores de amapola como una metáfora de cómo la droga invadía su espacio doméstico. A pesar de la explicación literal de esta instalación, no puedo evitar pensar en la obra La muerte de Marat de Jacques-Louis David. La bañera negra vacía en la instalación se puede interpretar como un ataúd o sitio de entierro entre el jardín de flores de amapola. Las amapolas se han utilizado durante mucho tiempo como un símbolo de sueño, paz y  muerte (o mortalidad). Sin embargo, sostengo que esta interpretación no es la de la muerte literal, sino una figurativa: la muerte de la inocencia, la confianza y la seguridad.

Era importante para la  artista alterar los objetos para uso doméstico o usar objetos directamente desde el hogar para la instalación. En la pieza final de la instalación multimedia titulada “ It must have blended in with the counter, so she left it behind., la artista incluye una puerta blanca que se abre para ver una mesa de pasillo y un marco de fotos familiar que cuelga arriba. En lugar de incluir imágenes familiares en el marco, Stone coloca imágenes de diferentes tipos de granitos que asemejan varias muestras de color de la heroína. En la mesa del pasillo, se ve un balancin de caballito  blanco, muestras de granito y un reloj de arena lleno de semillas de amapola.En referencia al término coloquial del opio, así como a la heroína, la morfina y la codeína, Stone nubla la línea entre la parafernalia y los artículos domésticos cotidianos. Ella hace un esfuerzo por ocultar o mantener estos artículos versátiles del hogar al aire libre como algo inocente.

 

Las cuatro instalaciones de la exhibición se titularon basadas en las conversaciones que Stone tuvo con su esposo al percatarse de estos objetos. Cuando su esposo encontró la bolsa de drogas en el mostrador y se dio cuenta de que era heroína, no quería estar en lo cierto. El artista eligió esas palabras exactas para titular esta exposición catártica. Stone comparte con nosotros el viaje personal de la vulnerabilidad, la negación, la frustración y el descubrimiento. Ella menciona que nunca antes había experimentado la negación y nunca lo había entendido completamente hasta ahora. La artista comparte que su relación con dicho miembro de la familia no le permitió pensar objetivamente al ver estos artículos en la casa.

Enfrentar la realidad de que un ser querido es un adicto y ha traicionado tu confianza es extremadamente difícil. Si bien no podemos reclamar la experiencia de Stone como nuestra, o entender completamente por lo que ella pasó, no puedo evitar sentir una ligera desconexión. Tal vez sea la presentación limpia y ordenada de cada obra que no me permitió involucrarme completamente con el viaje personal y emocional que Stone y su esposo atravesaron. Mientras hablaba sobre su práctica, Stone mencionó que este era su primer trabajo totalmente personal, y quizás aun  existen barreras internas que impiden que esos sentimientos personales entren en la obra y que, por lo tanto, el espectador los experimente. Realmente admiro a Stone por abrir y compartir un testimonio personal. Poner todo tu ser y tus experiencias en tu arte es un proceso muy vulnerable, y espero ver a Stone utilizar esta práctica más a menudo en el futuro.

En línea con su misión y visión, la exposición actual de Mantle Art Space, I Didn’t Want to be Right, elimina las barreras dentro de la creación y la experiencia del arte contemporáneo. Tilley Stone y Mantle Art Space utilizan el arte para ayudar a compartir historias personales, dificultades y crecimiento con la comunidad. Si usted o alguien que conoce puede estar luchando contra la adicción, no dude en comunicarse con el Centro de Recuperación de San Antonio o con la Administración Nacional de Abuso de Sustancias y Servicios de Salud Mental.

Sobre el artista

Tilley Stone se crió en Pearland, Texas y recibió un BFA de la University of North Texas (2008). Permaneció activa en la escena artística del norte de Texas después de graduarse exhibiendo dibujos y pinturas en Dallas / Fort Worth. Continuó su educación en la Universidad de Cincinnati, donde recibió una beca de viaje para una residencia de artistas en Budapest, Hungría (2011). Después de graduarse con un MFA, se mudó a Texas y comenzó a trabajar con los estudiantes de Alvin Community College. Su objetivo es cultivar un entorno creativo que sea accesible para la comunidad al apoyar el crecimiento y los logros de los estudiantes a través de la creación de arte.

I Didn’t Want to be Right
On View through March 1, 2019
Mantle Art Space
714 Fredericksburg Road
San Antonio, TX, 78201
By Appointment Only
mantlestudios@gmail.com

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.